Statistics Blog

Earlier
We celebrated Jerzy Neyman’s Birthday (April 16, 1894) last night in our seminar: here’s a pic of the cake. My entry today is a brief excerpt and a link to a paper of his that we haven’t discussed much on this blog: Neyman, J. (1962), ‘Two Breakthroughs in the Theory of Statistical Decision Making‘ [i] […] → The post Neyman vs the ‘Inferential’ Probabilists appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Thu, Apr 18, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
4:10pm Monday, April 22 in Social Work Bldg room 903: Data is getting weirder. Statistical models and techniques are more complex than they have ever been. No one understand what code does. But at the same time, statistical tools are being used by a wider range of people than at any time in the past. […] → The post “Sometimes all we have left are pictures and fear”: Dan Simpson talk in Columbia stat dept, 4pm Monday appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Thu, Apr 18, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
JASP is a free and open source statistics package that targets beginners looking to point-and-click their way through analyses. This article is one of a series of reviews which aim to help non-programmers choose the Graphical User Interface (GUI) for R, which best meets their needs. → → The post A Comparative Review of the JASP Statistical Software appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Thu, Apr 18, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
A Latin square Le Monde mathematical puzzle that I found rather dreary: A hidden 33 board contains all numbers from 1 to 9. Anselm wants to guess the board and makes two proposals. Berenicke tells him how many entries are in the right rows and colums for each proposal, along with the information that no […] → The post Le Monde puzzle [#1092] appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Wed, Apr 17, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
A Latin square Le Monde mathematical puzzle that I found rather dreary: A hidden 33 board contains all numbers from 1 to 9. Anselm wants to guess the board and makes two proposals. Berenicke tells him how many entries are in the right rows and colums for each proposal, along with the information that no entry is at the right location. Anselm deduces the right board. Which I solved by brute force and not even simulated annealing, first defining a target ordoku1=ordoku2=matrix(1,9,2) ordoku1[,1]=c(1,1,1,2,2,2,3,3,3) ordoku1[,2]=rep(1:3,3) ordoku2[,1]=c(3,2,3,1,2,3,2,1,1) ordoku2[,2]=c(2,2,3,2,3,1,1,3,1) fitz=function(ordo){ (sum(ordo[c(1,4,7),2]==1)==1)+(sum(ordo[c(2,5,8),2]==2)==1)+ (sum(ordo[c(3,6,9),2]==3)==0)+(sum(ordo[c(1,2,3),1]==1)==1)+ (sum(ordo[c(4,5,6),1]==2)==1)+(sum(ordo[c(7,8,9),1]==3)==2)+ (sum(ordo[c(6,7,9),2]==1)==2)+(sum(ordo[c(1,2,4),2]==2)==1)+ (sum(ordo[c(3,5,8),2]==3)==2)+(sum(ordo[c(4,8,9),1]==1)==1)+ (sum(ordo[c(7,2,5),1]==2)==1)+(sum(ordo[c(1,3,6),1]==3)==0)+ (!(0%in%apply((ordo-ordoku1)^2,1,sum)))+(!(0%in%apply((ordo-ordoku2)^2,1,sum))) } on a 99 board entry reproducing all items [...]
Wed, Apr 17, 2019
Source: Xian Blog
My second Jerzy Neyman item, in honor of his birthday, is a little play that I wrote for Statistical Inference as Severe Testing: How to Get Beyond the Statistics Wars (2018): A local acting group isputting on a short theater production based on a screenplay I wrote: “Les Miserables Citations” (“Those Miserable Quotes”) [1]. The […] → The post Jerzy Neyman and “Les Miserables Citations” (statistical theater in honor of his birthday yesterday) appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Wed, Apr 17, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog

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