Statistics Blog

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R users have been enjoying the benefits of SQL query generators for quite some time, most notably using the dbplyr package. I would like to talk about some features of our own rquery query generator, concentrating on derived result re-use. Introduction SQL represents value use by nesting. To use a query result within another query … Query Generation in R → The post Query Generation in R appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
Someone who wishes to remain anonymous writes: This paper [“p-Hacking and False Discovery in A/B Testing,” by Ron Berman, Leonid Pekelis, Aisling Scott, and Christophe Van den Bulte] ostensibly provides evidence of “p-hacking” in online experimentation (A/B testing) by looking at the decision to stop experiments right around thresholds for the platform presenting confidence that […] → The post P-hacking in study of “p-hacking”? appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
There are an infinite number of elliptic curves, but a small number that are used in cryptography, and these special curves have names. Apparently there are no hard and fast rules for how the names are chosen, but there are patterns. The named elliptic curves are over a prime field, i.e. a finite field with […] → The post Naming elliptic curves for cryptography appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Sat, Feb 16, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
A picture taken at Jericho Cheese, Little Clarendon Street, Oxford, that I took this week when I visited this cheesemonger for the first time, after several years of passing by its tantalizing display of British cheeses! It happens to have become my most popular picture on Instagram, ranking above the fiery sunrise over the Calanques, […] → The post say cheese [jatp] appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
A picture taken at Jericho Cheese, Little Clarendon Street, Oxford, that I took this week when I visited this cheesemonger for the first time, after several years of passing by its tantalizing display of British cheeses! It happens to have become my most popular picture on Instagram, ranking above the fiery sunrise over the Calanques, and the alignment of brains at the Institute of Brain in Paris! [...]
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Xian Blog
A weird puzzle from FiveThirtyEight: what is the probability that the product of three random integers is a multiple of 100? Ehrrrr…, what is a random integer?! The solution provided by the Riddler is quite stunning Reading the question charitably (since “random integer” has no specific meaning), there will be an answer if there is […] → The post take a random integer appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog

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