Statistics Blog

Earlier
A weird puzzle from FiveThirtyEight: what is the probability that the product of three random integers is a multiple of 100? Ehrrrr…, what is a random integer?! The solution provided by the Riddler is quite stunning Reading the question charitably (since “random integer” has no specific meaning), there will be an answer if there is a limit for a uniform distribution of positive integers up to some number N. But we can ignore that technicality, and make do with the idealization that since every second, fourth, fifth, and twenty-fifth integer are divisible by 2,4,5, and 25, the chances of getting a [...]
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Xian Blog
Yesterday I was going to go with this argument from Ethan: Now I’m morally bound to use the Erdos argument I said no one would see unless he made it to this round. Andrew will take the speaker out to dinner, prove a theorem, publish it and earn an Erdos number of 1. But then […] → The post The Japanese dude who won the hot dog eating contest vs. Oscar Wilde (1); Albert Brooks advances appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
Regarding this horrible Table 4: Eric Loken writes: The clear point or your post was that p-values (and even worse the significance versus non-significance) are a poor summary of data. The thought I’ve had lately, working with various groups of really smart and thoughtful researchers, is that Table 4 is also a model of their […] → The post More on that horrible statistical significance grid appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Fri, Feb 15, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
Manning has a new discount code and a free excerpt of our book Practical Data Science with R, 2nd Edition: here. This section is elementary, but things really pick up speed as later on (also available in a paid preview). → The post PDSwR2 Free Excerpt and New Discount Code appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Thu, Feb 14, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
“There is an unknown probability distribution P over some finite subset of the interval [0,1]. We get to see m i.i.d. samples from P for m of our choice. We then need to find a finite subset of [0,1] whose P-measure is at least 2/3. The theorem says that the standard axioms of mathematics cannot […] → The post undecidable learnability appeared first on StatsBlogs. [...]
Thu, Feb 14, 2019
Source: Statistics Blog
“There is an unknown probability distribution P over some finite subset of the interval [0,1]. We get to see m i.i.d. samples from P for m of our choice. We then need to find a finite subset of [0,1] whose P-measure is at least 2/3. The theorem says that the standard axioms of mathematics cannot be used to prove that we can solve this problem, nor can they be used to prove that we cannot solve this problem.” In the first issue of the (controversial) nature machine intelligence journal, Ben-David et al. wrote a paper they present a s the machine [...]
Thu, Feb 14, 2019
Source: Xian Blog

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